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2013 Gerald Anderson guitar workshop 004
2013 Gerald Anderson guitar workshop 004
Photo showing carving technique
Photo showing carving technique
forge
forge
Kevin Making a Box
Kevin Making a Box
Coal Fire in the Forge
Coal Fire in the Forge
Angel in Pottery Studio 2-6-09 018
Angel in Pottery Studio 2-6-09 018
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textile art10
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weaving hands.jpg 002

Heritage Collection

Heritage Collection

hc-display-caseTACS opened the Heritage Collection as a permanent installation on April 26th, 2008, exhibiting well over 200 artifacts native to Western North Carolina and specifically the Tryon area, some dating back a far as 1775.  Private collectors, anxious for visitors to be able share in the arts and crafts heritage of the area, loaned most of the pieces in the Heritage Collection to TACS.

 

Close to 200 visitors attended the Collection’s opening in April 2008.  Many guests were amazed by the transformation of the interior of our building from an old school cafeteria into a beautiful gallery and a Gift Shop.  One attendee said, “In addition to a school that teaches arts and crafts, we have a gallery that will attract visitors to see what contributions our area has made to the arts and crafts movement over the years.”

 

quilt-heritage-collectionSue Monroe, a weaving educator, Gallery Committee volunteer, and TACS member was in charge of procuring artifacts for the exhibit.  Sue said, “The most interesting part of my job was discovering what treasures people have saved or collected.  Almost everyone I spoke with gave me the name of someone else who had things they were willing to share with us and, in turn, with visitors to the gallery.”

 

On display are animals, dolls, and tiny pieces of furniture from the original Tryon Toy Makers and Wood Carvers.

hc-native-americanCherokee artifacts include a large collection of pottery by Maude Welch and several collections of arrowheads, tomahawks, dolls, and baskets.  Pieces from Pisgah Forest Pottery include a pitcher featuring a fine example of cameo or pate sur pate embellishment.

 

Rounding out the current exhibit are original forged work tools and kitchen tools, quilts, weavings, furniture, musical instruments, and paintings by local artists.

 

The Blue Ridge National Heritage Area and the Unrestricted Fund at the Polk County Community Foundation provide funding for our Heritage Collection.

 

We are accepting treasured pieces for display in the permanent Heritage Collection. Donations are tax-deductible, as we are a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation.